The Tax Act and Cannabis Employment Practices

tumblr_p2h0ictNTe1qjczh3o1_500.jpg
Looks like they are coming to an end. Will be buying another…
January 14, 2018
tumblr_oyve2x1Ydm1qjczh3o1_500.jpg
Legal Marijuana Cuts Violence says US Study, as Medical-Use Laws See Crime Fall
January 14, 2018
Show all

The Tax Act and Cannabis Employment Practices

8225639632_ebeac1b8cf_b-1-320x213.jpg
cannabis marijuana employment tax

Look out for a change in tax deductions for employer provided benefits — at least for some businesses.

President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) into law on December 22, 2017. The Act contains several sections that will impact companies that work with cannabis businesses and provide important indications of where states might be going with taxes in the coming year. As for the Act itself, its sweeping provisions went into effect on January 1, 2018.

Note that much of the Tax Act’s deductions and credits won’t apply to cannabis businesses due to IRC 280E, but these deductions and credits are still important to many ancillary businesses that serve the industry, and which may not be subject to 280E (we recommend that anyone with questions as to where they fall seek advice from their CPA or cannabis tax attorney). If these credits and deductions prove to be popular we may see states enact similar changes that will directly affect cannabis business themselves.

On the employment front, many cannabis businesses obtain employees through staffing agencies. Those agencies should will be subject to these new tax deductions and credits. We may see an influx of agency recruits, or a decrease, depending on how the recruitment companies take advantage of these deductions and how the new laws remove deductions for benefits provided to employees.

Sexual Harassment Settlements

Prior to 2017, we didn’t hear much about sexual harassment in the workplace. One reason for this is because a majority of sexual harassment settlements contain nondisclosure agreements. A nondisclosure agreement typically prohibits the employee from discussing the sexual harassment suit, its result or even the fact that harassment was ever alleged. Currently, employers are allowed to take a tax deduction for settlements paid out for sexual harassment and sexual abuse, regardless of the terms of the settlement agreement. That’s finally changing.

Going forward, employers cannot deduct settlement payments related to sexual harassment if the settlement agreement contains a nondisclosure agreement. Employers can receive a tax deductions on sexual harassment settlements that do not contain nondisclosure agreements. Payments in sexual harassment suits can be huge–meaning the tax deduction can also be huge. (Bill O’Reilly paid $32 million to one female accuser.) This will force employers to carefully consider how sexual harassment suits are settled, which is a welcome change. States might follow suit. Plan now how to handle sexual assault cases so you don’t Continue Reading


*This page contains viral feeds. We aggregate all of this content. This site shares recent posts, images and links from viral sources. All material is copyright to their respectful sources and no copyright infringement is intended.

Leave a Reply

Loading...

Are you over 21?

Please verify your age